Locking Knives

Locking Knives

Locking Knives

Liner locks, frame locks, back locks, axis locks and more - there are many different locking mechanisms but all of them can help to make your knife safer by stopping the blade from closing on your fingers. However UK Laws must be adhered to so please read the following: click here
 


Liner Lock

Liner Lock

The Linerlock is one of the most common locking mechanism for folding pocket knives. It's disengaged by pushing to the left or right (depending on the knife) to enable you to close the knife. The modern Linerlock traces its lineage to the late 19th century, but in the 1980s the design was improved by American custom knifemaker Michael Walker.

Frame Lock

Frame Lock

Working in a similar way to liner locks but actually using the frame of the knife instead. Engagement and disengagement is the same process as for liner lock knives.

Lockback / Back lock

Lockback / Back lock

Spring loaded locking mechanism. Requires pushing down on a section of the back of the knife to unlock the blade allowing it to close.

Tri-Ad Lock

Tri-Ad Lock

Designed by Andrew Demko for Cold Steel, the Tri-Ad lock is probably the strongest locking mechanism on the planet. Based on the lock back with a few minor additions and tweaks. If you are after a folding knife for hard use look no further than one of the Cold Steel Tri-Ad locking knives.

Virobloc

Virobloc

Opinel's locking collar. Simply twist it to lock or unlock the knife. Can be used to lock it open or closed.

Axis Lock

Axis Lock

Back in 1998 a new blade lock design was introduced, developed and patented by custom knifemakers Bill McHenry and Jason Williams.The bane of folding knives is strength compared to a fixed blade. The AXIS Lock addresses the strength question by ensuring that the lock itself will not likely be the weak link. Benchmade says that in testing, the lock supported loads in excess of 200 lbs. without damage.

Arc / Piston Lock

Arc / Piston Lock

The Cam lock, or arc lock, uses a pivotal block to lock the blade in place. Considered one of the finest locks available, it is ambidextrous, extremely strong, safe, and easy to use. The Piston lock, or bolt-action lock, are very strong and easy to use. They employ a movable bar wedged between blade tang and knife handle to lock the blade. When pulled back against the spring tension, the tang is released.

 

Other Locking Mechanisms

Other Locking Mechanisms

Some of the less common locking mechanisms are CRKT AutoLAWKS, Spyderco's Ball Bearing Lock and Compression lock, Benchmade's Nak Lok, and the Ring Lock as used on Cold Steel's Kudu and Eland.